Viburnums all the way

Viburnums for the Late Winter Colours

 

A few weeks ago my attention was steered towards plants for late winter colour and I came across the viburnums.

Viburnum bodnantense “Dawn”
Viburnum bodnantense “Dawn”

One of those was a Viburnum bodnantense “Dawn”.

Beautiful deciduous shrub with strongly scented pink blooms. Best grown as a feature plant or in a mixed border as a focal point due to its very interesting branch structure and stunning flower clusters in the winter time and foliage-tinged reddish brown in early summer. We have one growing in the centre, and it has just delighted us with the first blooms of the season. It is a real treat indeed.

 

 

 

 

 

This made me think about viburnums a bit more than usual, and I came to realise that with all the different varieties now available on the market one could have an almost year-round display of colour and scent by simply planting a few of those delightful shrubs. And so here are my choices of viburnums to decorate a garden throughout the year. But be my guest, and do some more research also, you might come across something new and exciting.

 

Viburnum tinus “Eves Price”
Viburnum tinus “Eves Price”

One of the most spectacular in my opinion has to be Viburnum tinus “Eves Price”.

It is evergreen with dark and shiny foliage, and grows fast and high so it is ideal for shelter and privacy.

It is also very elegant when it covers itself with clusters of delicate, white flowers followed by dark purple berries. I love it so much I have planted four of those to act as features against my fence. In time I will trim them into spherical shapes. This is a very hardy shrub, it will do well in all soil types and sun or semi-shade. Minimal effort for maximum satisfaction with this viburnum.

 

 

 

Viburnums davidii
Viburnum davidii

And to stay with the evergreen theme but on a slightly shorter note, Viburnum davidii will be brought to everyone’s attention.

Its leathery and very dark leaves are oval in shape and provide contrast to the flat heads of white flowers in late spring. But the best features have to be the blue, metallic berries that are present almost all through the summer on red stems poking through the foliage. This is a low-growing variety that spreads well and could be used as a hedge or even ground cover under trees. Fully hardy and easygoing, ideal for any type of garden, or gardener. 🙂

 

 

 

Viburnum oppulus “Roseum”
Viburnum oppulus “Roseum”

We have autumn, winter and spring. Time for a summer flower in our viburnum selection and what better one than Viburnum oppulus “Roseum”?

The snowball tree was a feature here once before due to its amazing and very showy flower balls in the early summer.

But even though the flowers are spectacular, this viburnum will also provide us with a fabulous autumn display of burgundy red foliage. Another tall variety can reach up to 4 metres in height, is hardy and will do well in full shade or full sun alike. I can guarantee this plant will be a talking point with all of your garden guests, so don’t wait too long before you plant one.

 

 

 

Viburnums plicatum “Kilimanjaro”
Viburnum plicatum “Kilimanjaro”

Viburnum plicatum “Kilimanjaro” is the last one on my list of “must have’s” viburnums.

 Small (height of about 3 metres), hardy but prefers sunnier parts of a garden, this plant is a joy for us and the birds alike. Lacecup white flowers will decorate your shrub through May and June, bright red berries will invite the birds into the garden from July onwards, and September will bring us a display of purple and red foliage fit for a proper autumnal look. This viburnum is perfect for any type of garden and might I add it won a “plant of the year” award in 2015.

 

 

 

Those are the types that stunned me and made me want to have them all. But truth be told there are about 170 different viburnum varieties, all beautiful and easy enough to grow and enjoy, so no doubt everybody will find their favourite one. So start your research ladies and gents and invest in a viburnum or two. It is well worth the hassle.

 

Thank you,

Magda O’Byrne.